Renault (1970)

 Hilarious ad copy.



If it has a top speed of 85 MPH, then, I agree; you clearly have nothing to prove. I suggest staying out of the passing lane, though. 
From Popular Mechanics
Tags: ,
0 to 60 in 18.6 seconds? Holy shit, even today's most economy economy-cars do it in half that. This car would be a death trap on the road today! Not to mention growing old before you get anywhere. :)
There's a phrase popular with the classic import/small car crowd when discussing a car with an engine swap: 'More usable in modern traffic'. Which is a euphemism for 'these cars were dog slow'.
I think they were death traps on the road then and didn't survive long. Then again, maybe nobody was buying them to begin with. I grew up in the 70s and this doesn't spark a memory with me at all.
Kids on their bikes would be flipping you off as they passed you. So would the Amish in their horse-drawn buggies.
Is there more to the tag at the very top, the one that begins "if" or are they just trying to drive me crazy by putting a full stop at the end of a sub-clause?
Oh, you! ;)

Actually, it's mostly only clauses that begin with "if" and never finish the "then" that drive me batty. There's a car in the garage I use at work that has a bumper sticker that reads "If you believe!" and, thus, makes me want to smash a window or something, because it makes no sense. If you believe, what? What happens if I believe? and what am I supposed to believe in?! (Presumably it's about Christianity, because of the cross symbol incorporated in the message, but it still makes no sense.)
It's an "implied then" ... (there's actually a proper name for that construct) I think it is "then consider the product described below" In adverts they try to minimise the number of words as much as possible.

If you believe...<
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It's an "implied then" ... (there's actually a proper name for that construct) I think it is "then consider the product described below" In adverts they try to minimise the number of words as much as possible.

If you believe...<<then you will be saved/have eternal life/yada yada yada>>
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I think my auto-manhood beats this one, if just because it claims to be able to go to 110 mph. Not that I've ever tested that, but I know it can do 85 , if necessary. Then again, it doesn't really get the ladies.
man, they tried just about everything to sell Renault and Fiat to Americans back then.

the first Renault ad I saw was like, "last year's model sucked. if you said you'd never drive another Renault, please give our new model a try!" ummm ... sure.
Aw, I had a Renault when I was in high school. That thing was tremendously fond of overheating.
I had a 82 Renault Feugo with a 1.8l fuel injected engine.

Idiot savant. I could get 42 MPG by hyper-milaging it. (no kidding)

You couldn't put the sun visor down without screwing up the rearview mirror.

You couldn't pop the hatch without opening the drivers door.

I could go on and on...it was a hoot to drive and too expensive for a college student to repair.
My grandma had an '84 Renault Alliance. Beige, boxy, and utterly 1980's in its design. But she took excellent care of it and it only just recently conked out a few years ago. I have a soft spot for these cars.
Am trying to recall the last time I saw the word "milksop" used in an ad.

Or used anywhere, for that matter.